INN Blog

More Posts

Be a happy psycho!

 

Americans Express Mixed Feelings About Jobs, Economy

NEW YORK, Feb. 26, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Over the past few months the stock market has soared, with the Dow Jones Index hitting some of the best numbers in over five years. But housing stats have been up and down and consumer confidence has also been shaky. Add to this mix the impending sequester and spending cuts, and there could be some mixed feelings on the overall economy. Looking ahead, one-third of Americans (32%) expect the economy to be better in the coming year, two in five (40%) expect it to stay the same and almost three in ten (28%) expect it to get worse. These numbers are similar to one year ago, when 36% said the economy would be better, 40% said it would stay the same and 24% said it would get worse.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20100517/NY06256LOGO)

These are some of the results of The Harris Poll of 2,496 adults surveyed online between February 13 and 18, 2013 by Harris Interactive.

Looking at household financial conditions, half of Americans (50%) believe their financial conditions will remain the same over the next six months, while 23% believe it will be better and 27% believe it will get worse. There is a generational divide, with Echo Boomers (those 18-36) more likely than Matures (those 67 and older) to believe things will be better – 30% vs. 14%.

The Job Market
While there is still a concern about unemployment, more Americans say the job market in their region of the country is good (21%) than have said so since July of 2008, when 30% called the job market good. Although the numbers are improving, almost half of U.S. adults say that the job market in their region is bad (48%), while 31% say it is neither good nor bad.

The improvements in the job market are encouraging, but expectations for the future are mixed. Currently, 28% of Americans believe the job market in their region is going to be better over the next six months, while half (52%) say it will remain the same. One in five (19%) think it will be worse. Looking back almost a year to last March, one-third of U.S. adults (33%) thought the job market would be getting better, half (50%) thought it would remain the same and 17% believed it would be getting worse over the next six months.

Politics and the Economy
With all eyes on Washington this week for the sequester and in March as the current continuing resolution for keeping the government funded runs out, President Obama heads into these talks with Congress with mixed news. First, over one-third of Americans (36%) give him positive ratings on his handling of the economy which is the highest he has been since May, 2010. But almost two-thirds (64%) give the president negative ratings on how he is handling the economy. When it comes to confidence in the White House and Administration producing policies to help fix the economic crisis, over one-third of U.S. adults (37%) are confident they will be able to do so, but 63% are not confident.

Social Security changes you need to know now.

The Cost of Living
One of the main issues with this recovery is that expenses, such as gas, are taking a growing toll on paychecks that haven't increased very much in the past few years. A majority of Americans (57%) are concerned that their family's income will not be enough to cover all of their costs and expenses this year, while 43% are not concerned. One positive note is that this is down from the 63% who stated they were concerned last year. Not surprisingly, the higher a person's household income, the less likely they are to be concerned about covering their costs and expenses. However, it is somewhat alarming that large numbers of people even in the highest income brackets—47% of those who earn $75,000 to $99,999 and 37% of those who earn $100,000 or more—say they are concerned about meeting their costs and expenses.

So What?
Conflicting economic indicators, coupled with the continued stalemate in Washington, D.C. over budgetary issues, has created mixed feelings among Americans towards these various economic indicators. One issue that still hasn't been eased in the public's mind is that almost half (48%) believe the U.S. is still in a recession and only one-quarter (24%) believe the U.S. has come out of a recession and the economy is growing. Until consumers feel more confident that there are policies are in place to help and that they have enough money to pay their monthly bills, they will likely hold off on spending. This will not help the economy bounce back in a steady manner.

TABLE 1
PRESIDENT OBAMA'S JOB RATING ON THE ECONOMY - TREND
"Now, turning to something different, how would you rate the overall job that President Barack Obama is doing on the economy?"

Base: All adults

2009

Social Security changes you need to know now.

2010

March

April

May

June

Aug

Sept

Nov

Dec

Social Security changes you need to know now.

Jan

Mar

Apr

May

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

POSITIVE (NET)

47

49

46

43

39

40

34

36

31

32

33

36

      Excellent

13

13

10

3

9

7

6

6

5

5

6

6

      Pretty good

34

36

36

34

31

33

27

30

25

27

27

30

NEGATIVE (NET)

53

51

54

57

61

60

66

64

69

68

67

64

      Only fair

30

27

30

27

25

27

30

30

31

30

31

29

      Poor

23

24

24

30

36

33

37

34

39

37

36

34

 

 

2010

2011

June

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb*

Mar

May

June

July

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

POSITIVE (NET)

32

32

29

27

31

30

33

33

33

32

27

26

      Excellent

5

6

5

5

5

5

7

9

5

7

5

3

      Pretty good

27

26

24

22

26

25

26

24

28

26

22

23

NEGATIVE (NET)

68

68

71

73

69

70

67

62

67

68

73

74

      Only fair

32

29

31

33

30

34

30

22

29

28

30

33

      Poor

37

39

40

39

39

36

37

39

38

40

43

41

 

 

2011

2012

2013

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

March

Feb

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

POSITIVE (NET)

21

23

22

25

25

32

32

36

      Excellent

2

3

3

4

2

3

5

4

      Pretty good

18

20

20

22

22

29

27

32

NEGATIVE (NET)

79

77

78

75

75

68

68

64

      Only fair

33

36

32

34

34

30

29

26

      Poor

46

41

46

41

41

38

39

38

Note: Percentages may not add up exactly to 100% due to rounding; *In February "Not at all sure" was offered as a response choice and 4% responded in that way.

 

TABLE 2
PRESIDENT OBAMA'S JOB RATING ON THE ECONOMY – BY POLITICAL PARTY
"Now, turning to something different, how would you rate the overall job that President Barack Obama is doing on the economy?"

Base: All adults

 

Total

Political Party

Philosophy

Rep.

Dem.

Ind.

Cons.

Mod.

Lib.

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

POSITIVE (NET)

36

5

64

31

13

38

64

      Excellent

4

1

9

2

3

3

9

      Pretty good

32

5

54

29

10

34

55

NEGATIVE (NET)

64

95

36

69

87

62

36

      Only fair

26

18

29

29

13

33

27

      Poor

38

76

7

40

74

29

10

Note: Percentages may not add up exactly to 100% due to rounding.

 

TABLE 3 
EXPECTATIONS FOR THE ECONOMY IN THE COMING YEAR - TREND

"In the coming year, do you expect the economy to…?"

Base: All adults

 

2009

2010

April

May

Aug

Sept

Oct

May

June

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Improve

39

38

46

40

34

38

30

29

28

30

34

29

Stay the same

35

35

32

36

37

34

42

39

40

40

41

45

Get worse

26

27

22

24

29

28

28

32

32

30

25

26

 

 

2011

2012

2013

Feb

June

July

Sept.

Oct.

Dec.

Feb.

Feb.

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Improve

34

26

23

21

20

23

36

32

Stay the same

42

41

41

45

46

47

40

40

Get worse

25

33

37

34

34

29

24

28

Note: Percentages may not add up exactly to 100% due to rounding

 

TABLE 4
EXPECTATIONS FOR HOUSEHOLD FINANCIAL CONDITION IN NEXT SIX MONTHS
"Thinking about your household's financial condition, do you expect it to be better or worse in the next 6 months?"

Base:  All adults

 

Total

Generation

Echo
Boomers

(18-36)

Gen X

(37-48)

Baby

Boomers

(49-67)

Matures

(68+)

%

%

%

%

%

BETTER (NET)

23

30

23

21

14

  Much better

3

4

5

3

*

  Somewhat better

20

26

18

18

13

Will remain the same

50

50

52

47

56

WORSE (NET)

27

20

25

32

30

  Somewhat worse

20

16

17

23

24

  Much worse

7

4

7

9

6

Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding; * indicates less than .05%

 

TABLE 5
RATING OF CURRENT JOB MARKET IN YOUR REGION - TREND
"How would you rate the current job market of your region of the nation?"

Base:  All adults

 

2008

2009

June

July

Jan

April

June

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

GOOD (NET)

28

30

6

12

9

8

10

10

8

9

Neither good nor bad

18

19

18

20

19

21

22

20

18

19

BAD (NET)

53

51

76

68

72

71

68

70

73

72

 

 

2010

Jan

Mar.

April

May

June

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

GOOD (NET)

10

8

10

12

10

12

10

13

11

13

Neither good nor bad

20

18

21

20

25

22

21

21

23

24

BAD (NET)

70

73

70

68

66

66

69

66

66

63

 

 

2011

2012

2013

Jan

Feb

March

May

July

Sept

Oct

Jan

March

Feb

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

GOOD (NET)

13

15

13

16

12

11

9

14

20

21

Neither good nor bad

22

24

22

23

24

22

24

21

24

31

BAD (NET)

65

61

65

61

64

67

67

65

56

48

Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding

 

 

 

 

TABLE 6
RATING OF CURRENT JOB MARKET IN YOUR REGION – BY REGION
"How would you rate the current job market of your region of the nation?"

Base:  All adults

 

Total

Region

East

Midwest

South

West

%

%

%

%

%

GOOD (NET)

21

16

19

26

20

  Very good

3

1

5

5

2

  Somewhat good

18

15

15

21

18

Neither good nor bad

31

30

35

30

28

BAD (NET)

48

54

46

44

53

  Somewhat bad

33

38

31

28

37

  Very bad

15

16

15

15

16

Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding; * indicates less than .05%

 

TABLE 7
EXPECTATIONS FOR JOB MARKET IN YOUR REGION OVER NEXT SIX MONTHS – TREND
"How do you think that the job market in your region of the nation will change over the next 6 months?"

Base:  All adults

 

2009

2010

Jan

April

June

Aug

June

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

BETTER (NET)

15

23

21

28

26

23

21

23

30

25

  Will be much better

1

3

2

2

1

2

2

3

2

2

  Will be somewhat better

14

20

19

26

25

21

19

20

28

23

Will remain the same

36

42

47

47

53

49

53

53

50

54

WORSE (NET)

49

36

32

25

21

27

26

24

21

22

  Will be somewhat worse

36

29

24

19

15

22

20

18

15

16

  Will be much worse

14

7

8

6

6

5

6

6

6

6

 

 

2011

2012

2013

Jan

Feb

Mar

May

July

Jan

March

Feb

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

BETTER (NET)

31

31

32

30

22

27

33

28

  Will be much better

4

4

2

4

2

2

3

2

  Will be somewhat better

26

27

30

26

20

25

30

26

Will remain the same

51

51

52

49

53

53

50

52

WORSE (NET)

18

18

16

21

25

21

17

19

  Will be somewhat worse

13

13

11

14

17

14

11

15

  Will be much worse

6

5

6

7

8

7

6

5

Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding

 

 

TABLE 8
CONFIDENCE IN THE WHITE HOUSE PRODUCING POLICIES TO HELP FIX ECONOMIC CRISIS
"How confident are you that the White House and the Administration will produce policies to help fix the economic crisis?"

Base: All adults

 

2009

2010

2011

2013

Mar.

April

May

June

Aug.

Oct.

Nov

Jan

June

June

Oct.

Feb

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

CONFIDENT (NET)

57

57

55

49

53

44

44

41

39

33

27

37

  Very confident

16

17

17

12

16

13

9

10

7

8

4

6

  Somewhat confident

41

40

38

37

37

31

35

31

33

24

23

31

NOT CONFIDENT (NET)

43

43

45

51

47

56

56

59

61

67

73

63

  Not that confident

23

21

24

25

23

25

25

26

27

31

36

31

  Not at all confident

20

22

21

27

25

32

31

33

34

36

37

32

Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding

 

 

TABLE 9
CONCERNED ABOUT NOT HAVING ENOUGH INCOME
"How concerned are you that your family's income will not be enough to cover all your costs and expenses this year?"

Base: All adults

 

2010

2011

2012

2013

Household Income

$34,999 or less

$35,000

to

$49,999

$50,000

to

$74,999

$75,000 to $99,999

$100,000 or more

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Concerned (NET)

65

62

63

57

75

64

53

47

37

     Very concerned

26

25

26

19

32

22

18

13

5

     Somewhat concerned

39

37

37

37

43

42

35

34

31

Not concerned (NET)

36

38

37

43

25

36

47

53

63

     Not very concerned

24

27

24

29

17

26

33

33

39

     Not at all concerned

12

12

13

14

7

10

13

20

25

Note: Percentages may not add up exactly to 100% due to rounding.

TABLE 10
ARE WE IN A RECESSION?
"Thinking of the U.S. economy, which statement below is closest to your view?"

Base:  All adults

 

Sept.

2011

Feb

2012

Feb.

2013

Political Party

Rep.

Dem.

Ind.

%

%

%

%

%

%

The U.S. is still in a recession

69

56

48

64

32

52

The U.S. has come out of a recession
and the economy is growing

10

24

24

9

41

20

The U.S. came out of a recession but
will now enter a new recession

11

8

13

17

10

13

Not at all sure

11

12

16

11

17

15

Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding

 

Methodology
This Harris Poll was conducted online within the United Statesbetween February 13 and 18, 2013 among 2,496 adults (aged 18 and over). Figures for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, region and household income were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population. Propensity score weighting was also used to adjust for respondents' propensity to be online.

All sample surveys and polls, whether or not they use probability sampling, are subject to multiple sources of error which are most often not possible to quantify or estimate, including sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording and response options, and post-survey weighting and adjustments. Therefore, Harris Interactive avoids the words "margin of error" as they are misleading. All that can be calculated are different possible sampling errors with different probabilities for pure, unweighted, random samples with 100% response rates. These are only theoretical because no published polls come close to this ideal.

Respondents for this survey were selected from among those who have agreed to participate in Harris Interactive surveys. The data have been weighted to reflect the composition of the adult population. Because the sample is based on those who agreed to participate in the Harris Interactive panel, no estimates of theoretical sampling error can be calculated.

These statements conform to the principles of disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

 

The results of this Harris Poll may not be used in advertising, marketing or promotion without the prior written permission of Harris Interactive.

J42774
Q705, 713, 715, 718, 720, 725, 730, 735

 

The Harris Poll®#9, February 26, 2013
By Regina A. Corso, SVP, Harris Poll and Public Relations, Harris Interactive

About Harris Interactive
Harris Interactive is one of the world's leading market research firms, leveraging research, technology, and business acumen to transform relevant insight into actionable foresight. Known widely for the Harris Poll® and for pioneering innovative research methodologies, Harris offers proprietary solutions in the areas of market and customer insight, corporate brand and reputation strategy, and marketing, advertising, public relations and communications research. Harris possesses expertise in a wide range of industries including health care, technology, public affairs, energy, telecommunications, financial services, insurance, media, retail, restaurant, and consumer package goods. Additionally, Harris has a portfolio of multi-client offerings that complement our custom solutions while maximizing our client's research investment. Serving clients in more than 196 countries and territories through our North American and European offices, Harris specializes in delivering research solutions that help us - and our clients—stay ahead of what's next. For more information, please visit www.harrisinteractive.com.

Press Contact:
Corporate Communications
Harris Interactive
212-539-9600
press@harrisinteractive.com

 

 

SOURCE Harris Interactive

Source:  PR Newswire Association LLC
Wordcount:  2993


USER COMMENTS:

comments powered by Disqus

  More Life Insurance News

More Life Insurance News >>
  Most Popular Life Insurance News

More Popular Life Insurance News >>
Hot Off the Wires  Hot off the Wires

More Hot News >>

insider icon Denotes premium content. Learn more about becoming an Insider here.
Social Security changes you need to know now.